Valve Science Patients

Learn about valvular heart disease

With every heart beat, four valves open and close, ensuring that blood flows in the right direction through the heart’s chambers and to the the body. When the valves do not work, heart failure can occur and lead to premature death. Learn more about valvular heart disease here.

 

Do I qualify for a research study?

Patients who participate in research may be eligible for therapies that are not yet widely available. Each research study has its own enrollment criteria that must be met for participation.

As a research participant, you will continue to receive the same high-quality care. Research-related expenses are covered by insurance plans.

Learn more about current research studies here.

Landmark Achievements
  • First transcatheter mitral valve replacement in the U.S. Read more.
  • First-in-human therapy of severe mitral annular calcification. Read more.
  • First-in-human therapy of tricuspid regurgitation with the TriClip. Read more.
  • First-in-human therapy with the MyoCor device for treatment of mitral regurgitation. Read more.
  • First-in-human therapy of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with MitraClip. Read more.

Latest News

MHIF Well Represented at CRT2019

Several researchers from Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation represented at CRT2019 in Washington D.C. the first weekend in March. Amongst the team, there was a total of 43...

Valve Science Center Research Published in JAMA Cardiology

MHIF Valve Science Center Researchers, Drs. Miho Fukui and Joao Cavalcante authored a recent paper published in JAMA Cardiology regarding TAVR outcomes in aortic stenosis patients. Read...

Valve Science Center Featured in Delta SkyMiles Ad

Leading into Valve Disease Awareness Day (February 22), Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation's Valve Science Center was featured in the Delta SkyMiles ad. Dr. Paul Sorajja, Roger L....

We welcome patients, family and medical professionals to get involved in our research.

Patient Poem

Falling Waters

By: Margareth Cecilia Miller

The great deluge of tears,
that slick, liquid flowing
was unstoppable,
seeming to begin
at my feet,
rising,
gushing out of the weeks,
the months
of waiting.

This “water”
had become stifled
in all that waiting,
in all that anticipation,
waiting to hear,
to know,
whether my heart
could be saved
from the threat
of silence.

That “saving” of my heart
involved
intrusion and invasion
into my beating place,
and the insertion
of another creatures heart valve
into my core;
another had died
so I might live.

Through all that waiting
my fears mounted,
a slow, silent panic
crept within my bones
and my failing heart,
I acknowledged
the possible truth
that the surgery itself,
that intrusion into my heart,
could end my breathing.

But then
I was left to worry:
would my corroded aortic valve
halt its struggle
before that other creature’s
“non-offered” gift
could be slipped
within that fading beat
of my core?

But in the end,
amidst all my fears
and deep anxiety and pain,
my artery was opened
and life,
that amazing happening,
was tucked within my center.

With this success
a great deluge of tears,
that slick, liquid flowing
was unstoppable,
seeming to begin
at my feet,
and overpowering me,
as I acknowledged
I was alive.
I had made it through
the threat of dying.

No death for me today!

My sobbing was loud
and inexhaustible,
and oh, so very welcome.
For in the weeks
and months of waiting,
while my heart
had threatened to stop
I had been unable
to wash away,
to cleanse
the buildup of fear
and anxiety and dismay,
for
I had so believed
I would die.

Now,
this longed for gift,
this delicious beating heart,
this new hope of life,
was surging within,
and in response
to that reprieve
a great deluge of tears,
a sweet, gushing fluid,
was making itself felt
and known.
This amazing release
this “falling waters”
was simply
in total celebration.

 

Additional Resources

Looking for more information about heart conditions or clinical trials? Here is a list of reputable information resources that MHIF Physicians recommend:

Read about the team of physicians, scholars and staff at the Valve Science Center.